Getting back into training routine

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1 month 2 weeks ago - 1 month 2 weeks ago #40887 by Sam_Atlas
Hi,
I've just taken the past six eight months off because of an hernia that I didn't want to make worse.

I have surgery planned and the itch to get back out, but I am wondering about the best way ease my way back into a training routine.

Any ideas?
Last edit: 1 month 2 weeks ago by Sam_Atlas. Reason: Grammar

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1 month 2 weeks ago #40888 by mrcharly
Lots and lots of work with therabands, to strengthen shoulders.

If you have a desk job, tie a theraband around a leg of the desk. Whenever you think of it, do 5-10 reps.

Arm up, arm sideways, arm back. All sorts of movements.

It is crucial to do them slowly.

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1 month 1 week ago - 1 month 1 week ago #40889 by Watto
As above Sam_Atlas. Suggest also consult your doctor for pre and post-op exercise advice relative to your hernia and your post-op recovery programme. Have had two hernia ops, can't recall they slowed me up too much. I kinda-sorta did what I was told, if you know what I mean, pushing the envelope a bit and pulling back a bit when body said so.

All up just wee bump in the road. Good luck and keep at it.
Last edit: 1 month 1 week ago by Watto.

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1 month 1 week ago #40891 by mrcharly
I'm also getting also getting back into fitness, and my weakness is in my legs.

Top of inside of thighs gets tired before anything else.

I've started doing leg extensions, standing, leg from behind to ahead with a band around ankle.

Other suggested exercises welcome.

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1 month 1 week ago #40895 by LaPerouseBay
^This is a good one. Great site for visualizing the core.


downwind dilettante
The following user(s) said Thank You: mrcharly

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1 month 1 week ago - 1 month 1 week ago #40896 by LaPerouseBay
Here are a few of the muscles that are stabilizing the other side of the hip joint as the adductors contract.
This video has a description of the hip joint, rotating as we walk. It can help illustrate what we are doing when we paddle. Ideally, our hip rotates similar to the walking gait - but with fixed feet.
So, for the diagram in the video, imagine the left leg driving back, right leg moving toward the footplate. The adductors on the left leg are contracting. Left hip is rotating inward.

It's at 7:28.


downwind dilettante
Last edit: 1 month 1 week ago by LaPerouseBay.

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1 month 1 week ago #40897 by mrcharly
Hmm. Food for thought in there.

I'm a home-based desk worker. That means I barely even walk anywhere.

From that video, it sounds like it would be a really good idea for me to add some walking and jogging to my daily routine.

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1 month 1 week ago - 1 month 1 week ago #40898 by LaPerouseBay
Walking yes, jogging or running - leave it to the youngsters.
Peter explains why. (8x bodyweight thru the patellar tendon).
He just did a great podcast with a foot expert. She informed him that the 8x load is also experienced by areas of the ankle, forefoot and the achilles tendon.
If you do jog, don't do it with a cushioned shoe. She goes thru the myths and terrible damage runners suffer. I switched years ago and it fixed a lot of stuff. It didn't take long either, just a matter of days. We need to feel the ground.
She explains that we are capable of dealing with the 8x bodyweight load thru our bare feet. It's how we evolved, But you can't screw up the energy transfer chain with cushioned shoes... It throws everything out of whack. Great show.
There is a better, safer way to get stronger legs, with cardio.
It starts at 1:43:11.



downwind dilettante
Last edit: 1 month 1 week ago by LaPerouseBay.

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1 month 1 week ago #40899 by mrcharly
Can't agree with rejection of cushioned shoes.

I have extensive experience of running barefoot. Completed a few (on road) half marathons barefoot.

And by barefoot, I mean bare. Not these stupid pretend shoes.

If you are going to be safe running without protective soles, you need to be able to feel the ground. The consistency, so that if, for example, your foot comes down on a sharp rock, you react instantly. Any sort of covering over your foot gets in the way of that.

So, my experience of barefoot running:
No issues, ever, with shin splints.
Callouses form, adequate for protection against most debris (I've got home after a run and found glass and rose thorns stuck in the callous; didn't even feel them, no blood drawn).
Superior when running in the wet - no blisters from wet socks rubbing.
No blisters, period!
Wet grass, or mud is problematic. Very little grip.
Downhill; here is a huge weakness. Barefoot running puts *more* stress on the knee, because it is flexing on the knee that provides the shock adsorption. (Think about it; in a running gait, it is the only joint that can flex to absorb shock when the heel strikes). Running on the flat, there is no difference, because the foot rolls heel-toe and little shock. Downhill, the stress goes up hugely.

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